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Posts Tagged ‘“Zoe Pollak”’

 

by Zoe Pollak

(Bolded words are revised.)

In the world of science, you would need a machine that moves faster than the speed of light to travel through time. But you involuntarily move through this dimension every day.

 You may regard the past as cemented, but it is always changing. Let’s say you have a lot of work to do. You might reminisce longingly about being in grade school, when you were free to take time for granted. But if you revisit that same moment on a different day, your naiveté might appear as a limitation.

 Your memory will always refine particular moments and blur others, and its multiple realities are as infinite as the parallel universes that exist in theoretical physics.

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by Zoe Pollak

In order to travel through time, you would have to harness the power of a star. But you involuntarily move through this dimension every day. You may regard the past as cemented, but it is always changing. If you have a lot of work to do, you might reminisce about being in grade school and think back to when you took time for granted. If you revisit the same moment on a different day, you might instead be drawn to the shortcomings of its simplicity. Your memory will always refine particular moments and blur others, and the combinations of alterations are as infinite as the parallel universes that exist in theoretical physics. The past’s fluidity is memory’s only constant.

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by Zoe Pollak

Dear Jeremy,

Thank you for your suggestions for last post’s questions. I looked up both books on Amazon, where I was allowed to read the first two pages or so of each. Reading them side by side, it was interesting to compare the author’s relationship with his subject: while Heschel starts off with the personal and (at least I’m assuming) then ventures on to the more collective, Yerushalmi starts by talking about memory in very broad terms- Jewish history and “Jewish past.” Both works helped me in looking at my own project, because I’m combining the personal and the ethereal (as Sam said) to present my “thesis” about memory and the past: I’m using home videos and my own writing, but I’m also using videos of natural processes, old music, and the writings of others (many of them happen to be Jewish) to offer different views of time and memory.

So my follow-up-question is: do you know of any other Jewish scholars, historians, or professors who have tackled large topics such as history, the past, memory, and time using a personal lens as either a starting point to ground his/her audience or to establish conceits and draw parallels?

Thanks!

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by Zoe Pollak

When the viewer first enters the Memory Paths (Zoe’s Time Machine) website, a typed introduction will appear for them to read. This introduction will establish the context for the interactive clock and its memory pods. Here’s a draft for my intro. Any feedback would be great.

Memory Paths

 Currently, physics does not allow for time travel to the past or future. In order to visit your ancestors or travel to the year 2020, scientists would have to harness the power of a star and you would have to travel faster than the speed of light. And even if time machines did exist, you would not be able to travel farther back in time than the point of their creation. But you travel back in time every day, and not solely by remembering an event that occurred a long time ago. This time travel is involuntary.

Perhaps when you think of your childhood, nostalgia distorts the positive aspects of your youth and dims the more difficult memories. If you have a lot of work to do on a given day, you might reminisce about being in grade school and think back to when you took time for granted. On a rewarding day, you may revisit that same time in the past, but will instead focus on the fact that your outlook was not mature enough to appreciate what has brought you satisfaction today.

While your past is often regarded as theoretically cemented, it changes every day – its fluidity is the only constant. Memory will always refine particular moments and blur others, but the combination of alterations is as infinite as the parallel universes that exist in theoretical physics. And because by the end of tomorrow evening you will have garnered several more new memories, your memory’s collection of refractions only increases.

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by Zoe Pollak

-Find image of clock for webpage interface

-Write intro for project (description of project that provides context for the viewer)

-Finish writing for all memory pods

-Finalize music list

-Finish recording quotations

-Find footage of time-lapsed flowers, stars

-Think of settings for new footage to shoot

-Export DVD material to computer so that I can edit it

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by Zoe Pollak

In response to Thursday’s session, I came up with a couple of questions relating to my theme and Jewish culture/history:

-What different notions of time were held among Jewish physicists such as Einstein and Feynman?

-Are there any portions in the Torah that discuss memory and time in relation to one another?

Albert Einstein

Richard P. Feynman

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by Zoe Pollak

After meeting with Sophie, Emma, and Julie last Thursday, my project changed once again. For the span of about five days, I was sure I was going to create a single-channel film, but after Thursday we have decided to go back to the interactive website idea. However, this new website will be very different from the previous idea; this new idea presents the viewer with a clock, and in each number, a “memory pod.” Each memory pod is composed of a visual and an audio piece. The viewer gets to choose what audio piece they want to hear while watching the video, which is the interactive part of the piece. So for example, the number 7 on the clock might be an old family video, and the viewer gets to choose whether they want to play a quote or a piece of music against the visual. Some of the audio pieces will repeat from number to number in the hope that the viewer will “accidentally” choose the same piece of music twice, but for different visuals. I want this repetition to allow the viewer to experience different emotions around the same audio clip, which draws off of the previous interactive webpage idea- my interest in the five sense’s influence over memory and how one particular sense can govern a person’s emotional attachment to a specific time in the past. Each time the viewer selects a new number, the webpage will refresh so that the clock’s numbers are jumbled. The clock’s numbers will only be in order at the beginning, because I want the interface to reflect my theme: the interpretation of the past is continually changing based on current experiences.

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